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Horn of Africa has a True Friend in KickStart International

2011 August 17

If you drank a glass of water today, made lunch for your child, took a shower or looked out the window and saw green trees or gardens or the blue of a pond or lake, then express your gratitude for these everyday luxuries we take for granted by thinking about those who cannot.


Your collective affordable donations will go a very long way toward helping those trapped by hunger and poverty and held hostage by unreliable rains.

 

The very first organization profiled in Give a Little: How Your Small Donations Can Transform Our World is KickStart International.  KickStart innovates technologies that poor people living in developing countries can use to earn a reliable wage and access.

Over the past 12 years, KickStart’s micro-irrigation pumps have lifted 570,000 people out of poverty and created 114,000 new businesses that generate $115 million in wages and profits annually.

The following is an appeal by KickStart, which I believe provides one of the most effective, efficient and affordable methods out of hunger and poverty for families and entire communities.  If you want to help ease the suffering in Africa’s drought and famine stricken areas, consider a donation to KickStart.

 

 

 

 

 

August 8, 2011

Dear Friends of KickStart,
We are reaching out to you because as a friend of KickStart you are a friend of Africa. We know

you are aware of the dreadful famine in Kenya, Somalia and Ethiopia. Thousands have already

died, and more are dying every day.

 

But millions more are desperate, teetering on the brink. They need your help now!

So please donate today and help KickStart help them survive.

 

Droughts and famine result from climate change. When farmers can no longer predict rainfall,

their crops fail, their pastures dry up and their animals die. Whole families are left destitute,

with no food to eat and not even enough water to drink.

 

For the past 12 years KickStart’s MoneyMaker pumps have been helping poor farmers in Africa

to access water. Over 120,000 farmers are already using them to pull water from ponds, rivers

and shallow wells to irrigate crops and water livestock. Even when the rains fail they grow high

value crops, make money and escape poverty.

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In Eastern Kenya, which suffered a terrible drought a few years ago, thousands of families are now using MoneyMaker pumps to irrigate from shallow wells and water catchments, and can grow food – even in this dry season.

KickStart is now ready to launch a major effort to help the drought victims in Kenya.

We will:

    1.    Visit stricken regions where disaster can still be averted if people get water and grow food2.    Identify the sites where farmers can use our pumps 

    3.    Distribute pumps to farmers and train them to water animals and irrigate fast

    growing crops

 

In addition, KickStart will partner with relief agencies working in the  whole drought-affected region to help reach more families in need, and train local shops to sell pumps and 
spare parts in the stricken areas.


This effort will bring water to thousands of people and their animals and quickly get hundreds of acres under cultivation. It will enable families to survive not only this drought, but also to be prepared for and survive future droughts that will inevitably strike again.


KickStart can’t do this alone. We urgently need your help! We need funds to pay for transport, pumps and staff to bring water to those in desperate need. Your gift at this time will save families who are teetering on the edge – enabling them to stay in their communities and survive.

 

We hope you will join us in making this a reality!

 

Please help us help the hungry and starving in the Horn of Africa. Make a donation today via our website here, by calling our offices at 415-346-4820,

or by mailing a check to 2435 Polk Street, Suite 21, San Francisco, CA 94109.

Please add the code FAM in the comments/memo section of your online donation or check.

 

With deepest thanks.


 

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